SVdP Shoes Outreach
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Stacy Glaus

Our St. Vincent de Paul Ministry

This weekend, The Basilica was planning to hold our annual St. Vincent de Paul pledge drive. Once a year, The Basilica invites our community to learn about, pledge financial support, and become part of the important work of our St. Vincent de Paul ministry. We had brochures created, letters written, stories gathered, speakers identified, volunteers signed up. We were ready!

Yet, today we are being challenged to reconsider what it means to “be ready.” A new reality asks; how are we identifying, preparing, and responding to the unique needs of this day? 

As we learn how to live with COVID-19, and as we seek to make decisions respecting and upholding the common good, new questions arise—new paradigms are developed—new fears are unmasked—new hopes are uncovered—and new responses are called for.

The core of our Basilica St. Vincent de Paul Ministry are relationships. Its mission is “To develop community by providing services to our guests and by working to help all fulfill their potential.” In practice, we know all benefit and experience transformation through these relationships: staff, volunteers, and those we serve. All are touched and changed in our work.

I see and hear the harsh realities of life under COVID-19 through my work at The Basilica. People are suffering. Those who were most vulnerable are more isolated and in greater need than before. Programs that serve have been suspended. People who felt secure are now insecure. The health risks are real, especially for the most vulnerable. The economics of the pandemic are unfathomable—and hitting many people hard today.

As we walk through Lent 2020, the experience of Christ in the Garden of Gethsemane on Good Friday has become my guiding prayer. Jesus went with some of his disciples to pray. He was distressed and troubled. In his sorrow, he separated himself and fell to the ground. Three times he prayed that his burden would be removed. Yet, he yielded to the will of his Father. He grieved and struggled, and ultimately accepted what he had to do. We know how this story ends—with resurrection and the promise of new life. Yet it was a hard and painful journey. 

To get ready, Jesus went away to pray. He brought along companions. He was honest about his fears and courageous in his actions. Ultimately, he stood up and modeled a commitment to forgiveness, love, self-sacrifice and justice. 

As we live into the unimaginable reality of live-streamed Masses and closed-down cities, we are invited to reflect deeply on how we get ready. We are challenged to let go of preconceived needs and expectations, and surrender parts of our life that sustained us in the past. 

This Lent, as we walk through this pandemic together, we are challenged to find new ways to nurture and build relationships. We are inspired by the courage of first responders, the selflessness of grocery store workers, and the goodness of people who reach out “virtually” to check in and support another. Let us not forget those suffering around us. Though often invisible, we need one another.

Find Volunteer Opportunities related to the COVID-19 pandemic mary.org/volunteer.

 

 

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Comments

Janice-
Thank you very much for your thoughtful, meaningful article.
How I miss being there for our guests.

As you suggest, prayer is the best. Many, many prayers for all those in need at this time. And prayers of appreciation for our health care workers, etc.

God bless you, and thank you!

Laura

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