Weekly Musings

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The Paschal Mystery

The Sacred Triduum (Holy Thursday – Good Friday – Holy Saturday – Easter Sunday) is my most cherished time of the entire liturgical year. This was instilled in me from a young age as the celebration of the Sacred Triduum was an essential part of my family’s religious experience. 

I fondly remember being one of the twelve who had their feet washed on Holy Thursday, the year I was confirmed. Even then I had a real sense that this small gesture embodies the essence of what it means to be a Christian. And being a lover of processions, how could I ever forget the solemn procession with the Blessed Sacrament. 

At 3:00pm on Good Friday my grandmother gathered our family and everyone who worked in her shoe factory for prayer. I don’t remember what she said but I remember the gravity of the moment. At night, we walked the Stations of the Cross which were set up throughout the city. I will never forget the silent and solemn cadence of the movement and the music. 

Holy Saturday, known to us as Silent Saturday, was a very quiet day. We spoke in hushed voices and tried not to disturb anyone from their prayerful ponderings and hopeful anticipation. At night, we all participated in the great Easter Vigil. Though our Easter Fire at The Basilica is much more impressive than the one we had at home, I still remember standing around it and experiencing the light shining in the darkness. From the very first time I heard the Exsultet sung I wished that one day I would sing it myself.  

Easter Sunday was a most holy day which we spent in church around the table of the Lord and then around the banquet table in my grandmother’s home.

Though I realize things are very different today, all these memories will come flashing back when we celebrate this year’s Triduum.

Below are some suggestions for a fruitful celebration of the Paschal Mystery today.

  1. If at all possible take the Triduum off from work and make it a short retreat. 
  2. Carve out time for personal prayer. 
  3. Try to participate in all our Triduum liturgies.  You can find a list in the Newsletter and online.
  4. When participating in the liturgies do so with full heart, mind, and soul.
  5. Bring your family to the liturgies. We engage in so many beautiful symbolic actions which speak to the liturgical imagination even of the youngest.
  6. If you are not able to be present, please join us in prayer. 
  7. Be sure to pray for those who will be joining the Catholic Church during the Easter Vigil. They are our Easter gift to the Church.

The beautiful liturgies of Holy Week are prepared with great care. Our staff and so many volunteers worked very hard to assure that everyone has a profound experience of the Mystery of our Salvation. Please join us so you may be refreshed and renewed in your faith.  

Blessed Holy Week!

Lenten banners hung above sanctuary

Noon Mass March 23

Lenten banners hung above sanctuary

Noon Mass March 20

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Find Your “Why”

A few weeks ago, my husband sent me a link for a quiz he found in his work with undergraduate students. I’m generally skeptical of these black & white quizzes but it was a slow day at work….

The quiz was called “The Four Tendencies” and it focuses on what motivates people and how understanding that can help you get more done. 

After only a few minutes of clicking, my results were in. Apparently, I’m an Obliger: “I do what I have to do. I don’t want to let others down, but I may let myself down.” My husband was surprised, he thought for sure I’d be a Questioner: “I do what I think is best, according to my judgment. If it doesn’t make sense, I won’t do it” or a Rebel: “I do what I want, in my own way. If you try to make me do something—even if I try to make myself do something—I’m less likely to do it.” 

I wasn’t particularly surprised by my results. While I tend to come across as constantly questioning the status quo (my mom used call me “Contrary Mary”), I find that unless I have someone depending on me to produce, I procrastinate.

This is where you come in. I care deeply about the welfare and longevity of our Basilica and our Catholic Church in general. However, I can get overwhelmed with the amount of work to be done and exhausted by all the competing priorities in my life. But knowing that you, the parishioners of The Basilica and the members of Deanery 13 have elected me to be your voice, motivates me to show up. 

So whether you are an Upholder who wants to know what should be done, a Questioner who wants justifications for actions, an Obliger who needs accountability or a Rebel who wants freedom to do something your own way—I encourage you to find that why and put it to use for the good of our home, The Basilica. 

We will soon be accepting nominations for Parish Council positions—consider if you (or someone you know) may be ready to take their experience in the pews to the next level as a Parish Council Representative. Parish Council members serve as an advisory group to the Pastor and assist with strategic planning, creation of effective communication structures, policies and procedures, and educating parishioners about biblical stewardship. They bring concerns of parishioners to the attention of Fr. Bauer and help direct the focus of parish departments. 

Are you worried that you don’t have enough experience or the right skills to participate?

I urge each of you search your hearts and consider if you might be ready to take the humbling step of becoming a volunteer in any capacity! Council members and other parish volunteer leaders will be available after weekend masses in the back of church. Please come and say hi, ask about how and why they serve or let them know if you have questions or concerns.

Thank you for your prayerful consideration of this call to leadership and please continue to pray for the wisdom and humility of all those in leadership positions. 

Mary Gleich-Matthews
Parish Council Secretary
The Basilica of Saint Mary

 

PARISH COUNCIL NOMINATIONS
Parishioners are invited to nominate excellent candidates to represent the Liturgy and Sacred Arts and Christian Life areas to the Parish Council by April 15. Submit the form online at mary.org/pcnominations

 

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HMMMMMM...

In the Catholic Church every five years diocesan bishops travel to Rome to meet with the Pope and members of the Curia to report on the state of their dioceses. It is a formal trip known as the “ad limina.” It is usually made together by all the bishops of a single region. The bishops of Minnesota and North and South Dakota made their “ad limina” visit to Rome this past January. On February 10, 2020, Pope Francis met with the bishops from New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming as part of their “ad limina” visit to Rome. 

After the meeting at least two of the bishops, who were present, spoke anonymously to the Catholic News Agency (CNA is owned by The Eternal Word Television Network. It provides news related to the Catholic Church to the global English speaking audience.). These bishops said that as part of their conversation Pope Francis indicated that while he had accommodated a request for a meeting with Fr. James Martin, S.J. he was clear with them that he did not intend for it to convey any significance. One of the bishops was quoted (anonymously) as saying that Pope Francis “made his displeasure clear” about the way the meeting was interpreted, and framed by some journalists.’ Another bishop said: "He told us that the matter had been dealt with; that Fr. Martin had been given a 'talking to' and that his superiors had also been spoken to and made the situation perfectly clear to him.” One of the bishops went on to say; “I do not think you will be seeing that picture of him (Martin) with the pope on his next book cover." 

As background to the above, it is important to know that Fr. James Martin, S.J. is a best selling author who advocates for and ministers to LGBT Catholics. In 2017 he authored the book “Building a Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community can enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion and Sensitivity.” On September 30, 2019 Fr. Martin met for 30 minutes in a private audience with Pope Francis and had his picture taken with the Pope. While Fr. Martin did not reveal what the Pope said to him in the course of their conversation, he did say that “among other things, I shared with Pope Francis the experiences of LGBT Catholics around the world, their joys and their hopes, their griefs and their concerns. I also talked about my own ministry to them and how they felt excluded.” Fr. Martin concluded by saying “I saw this audience as a sign of the Holy Father’s care for LGBT people.”

Now the above would not be all that newsworthy except for the fact that Archbishop John Wester of Santa Fe, New Mexico, recently responded publicly to the CNA account. In his statement Archbishop Wester said: “I wish to address the article that appeared in CNA regarding the meeting of the bishops of Region XIII and Pope Francis on Monday, February 10, 2020. The article puts forward a series of statements supposedly made by Pope Francis regarding Fr. James Martin's meeting with the Holy Father on September 30, 2019. The bishops who reported these statements to CNA remained anonymous throughout the article.” Archbishop Wester went on to say: "Our meeting with the Pope lasted almost two hours and forty-five minutes, so it is difficult for anyone to remember with precision anything that was said. "However, the general tone of the Pope's responses to issues raised with him was never angry, nor do I remember the Pope saying or implying that he was unhappy with Father Martin or his ministry." He also said that while Martin and his ministry were discussed, it was not the pope who raised it but rather some bishops. “My recollection is that it was not Father Martin the Pope was talking about, but the way others tried to use that encounter, one way or the other. In my view, the language subtlety, yet incorrectly, leads the reader to believe that Father Martin was the issue while, in fact, it was how others used their meeting that was in play. Furthermore, I have no memory at all of the Pope being angry, upset or annoyed. He spoke gently and patiently throughout our meeting.” Archbishop Wester ended his statement by saying: “Ordinarily, I would not be sanguine about offering these recollections of our wonderful meeting with Pope Francis. However, I believe that I have an obligation to offer my perspective on those matters contained in the CNA article about Father James Martin, SJ, since my understanding of the facts differs from what was reported anonymously.”

After Archbishop Wester’s statement, a second bishop also spoke up to counter allegations that Pope Francis expressed displeasure with Fr. Martin during the meeting with bishops of the southwestern United States. Bishop Steven Biegler of Cheyenne, Wyoming, said he supports the recollections of Archbishop John Wester of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Bishop Biegler said in part: that “Wester's response accurately describes the tone and substance of the short dialogue regarding Fr. James Martin," 

Hmmmmm, we have two bishops speaking publicly about their recollections of a meeting with the Pope, and at least two bishops speaking anonymously about their recollections of that same meeting, And interestingly and remarkably their recollections differ dramatically. What are we to make of this? Who are we to believe? Well, since I believe that the privilege of anonymity belongs only to God and people who are doing good works, my money is on Archbishop Wester and Bishop Biegler as being truthful and honest in their recollections. 

I am truly saddened and deeply disappointed, both personally and for our church, by those bishops who chose to make anonymous allegations about Fr. Martin. I believe the example of those bishops who made these anonymous statements is yet another instance of a failure in leadership in our Church. While I do believe that some of our bishops “get it,” this instance is clear evidence that some do not. More importantly, it causes me to wonder if the majority of our bishops will ever understand that truthfulness, integrity, transparency, and accountability are requirements for their job, and not just pious platitudes. 

 

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